ASEEES Blog

Is There Room for Early Modern Slavic Studies in the US and Canada?

Thirty years ago, the question of whether there is room for early modern Slavic studies would have seemed absurd. The field was booming. Path-breaking studies emerged on a regular basis.

An Interview with Oleh Kotsyuba about HURI's New Books Website

The new HURI Books website is unique in that it was created specifically to respond to these emerging challenges and to expand the tent of Ukrainian studies...

Operation ASEEES and The Slavic Connexion’s Other Adventures

This article originally appeared in the October 2020 NewsNet. 

A Philosopher on the Streets of Belarus

Belarusian philosopher, Tatiana Shchyttsova on the events in Belarus.

What’s in a Name? Are We Slavic, East European, Eurasian, or All of the Above?

This article was initially published in the August 2020 edition of NewsNet.

Collective Zoom Guilt and the Russian Studies Classroom

Written at the onset of the COVID-19 crisis, this essay remains relevant as many colleges and universities continue to operate within the online environment for the fall 2020 semester.

Originally published in the August 2020 NewsNet. To view endnotes, please visit the link.

Responses of Libraries to the COVID-19 Pandemic and Implications for Research

This article was originally published in the August 2020 Newsnet. To view the citations, please find the August 2020 NewsNet here.

Reflections on Our 2019 ASEEES Pedagogy Roundtables

This article was originally published in the August 2020 edition of NewsNet.

Kathryn Julian, Westminster College, and Johanna Mellis, Ursinus College

A Voice from the Slavic Studies Edge: On Being a Black Woman in the Field

This article was originally published in the August 2020 edition of NewsNet. To view endnotes, please visit the original article.

Kimberly St. Julian-Varnon, University of Pennsylvania

Memory Politics in an Illiberal Regime: Hungary’s New Trianon Memorial

As problematic monuments are being brought down in recent anti-racist protests around the world, Hungary, in contrast, saw the completion of a deeply flawed and tone-deaf memorial.

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